Don’t miss some of the most exciting temporary exhibits at D.C. museums this summer.

COURTESY NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART
COURTESY NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Degas/Cassatt

National Gallery of Art — West Building
Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue NW

In the late 19th century, Mary Cassatt left her native America to join the burgeoning impressionist movement in France, meeting Edgar Degas in the process. As the two became close friends, they created an artistic dialogue that fostered the sharing of ideas and techniques. The juxtaposition of their paintings and drawings in the National Gallery’s new exhibit provides insight into how these two figures worked in tandem as both artists and friends. On display through Oct. 5

 

Freer Gallery of Art
FREER GALLERY OF ART

Chinese Ceramics for Tea in Japan

Freer Gallery of Art
1050 Independence Ave. SE

The apparently simple collection of bowls, jars and other varied ceramics that were produced in China, used in Japan and are currently on show at the Freer Gallery reveals a relationship between the two Asian countries that stretches over 700 years. At the center of the exhibit is the Chigusa, a large, brown, glazed pot used in tea ceremonies. This is the first time the pot, which has been referenced in numerous written works, has ever travelled to the United States.  The 16th-century ceramics are presented just as described by the “tea men” in their 16th-century tea diaries. The collection speaks to the history of Japanese appreciation of Chinese tea objects. On display through Sept. 14

Pop Art Prints

AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
AMERICAN ART MUSEUMPop Art Prints

American Art Museum
Eighth and F St. NW

With a focus on the pop art movement of the 1950s and 60s, the American Art Museum’s new  exhibit provides a look at 37 rarely seen pieces from its permanent collection. Featuring works by Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol, the exhibit focuses on America’s fascination with pop art. Because of the popularity of this work, pop artists turned to commercial printing techniques to meet the huge demand for them. This installation tracks how the artists progressed toward a more commercial art technique. On display through Aug. 31

 

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART

Africa ReViewed: The Photographic Legacy of Eliot Elisofon

National Museum of African Art
950 Independence Ave. SW

This exhibit features the work of famed Life magazine photographer Eliot Elisofon and his experiences in Africa in the mid-20th century. Elisofon pioneered the use of color photography and shaped many Americans’ perceptions of Africa during this time. The works, which showcase what he considered to be the real culture of Africa, bring to life the richness and diversity of the regions. On display through Aug. 24

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Andrew Wyeth: Looking Out, Looking In

National Gallery of Art — West Building
Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue NW

This new exhibit at the National Gallery explores Andrew Wyeth’s fascination with the frame created by windows and the different views of the world one gets through them. The works, ranging from quick sketches to finished paintings, utilize windows to direct the viewer’s focus to the subject’s deeper aspects. Through the pieces’ apparent simplicity, viewers discover more abstract qualities. The exhibit, through its wide range of works, provides a new look at Wyeth’s career, going beyond his more well-known compositions involving the figure. On display through Nov. 30

ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY
ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY

An American in London: Whistler and the Thames

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
1050 Independence Ave. SE

James McNeill Whistler, an American-born, French-trained artist, explored the bustling city of London in the 19th century. His works document the changes in the city’s landscape brought on by industrialization. With oils, etchings, sketches and watercolors, this exhibit shows a wide range of Whistler’s works that provide snapshots of life in London and along the Thames. On display through Aug. 17

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