The Guide

Play Explores Private Parts, Public Problems

Vivacious. Awe-inspiring. Grotesque. Improper. Novel. Awkward. “The Vagina Monologues” has been called many things. People love it. People hate it. People don’t even know about it. As a result of the title’s embrace of the infamous “v-word,” many people avoid it. What about the word “vagina” makes us uncomfortable anyway?[Read More…]

by February 4, 2011 0 comments The Guide
Charged Up

Charged Up

As Wadhah Al Shugaa (SFS ’12) walks across the campus of the School of Foreign Service in Qatar, where he is currently studying abroad, all he hears — from the classroom to the souq— is talk of Egypt. “For the past seven days, we’ve had Al Jazeera on almost the entire[Read More…]

by February 3, 2011 0 comments The Guide

Delaney: When Portable Music Meant Something More

I am compact disc kid. I’ve long heard my parents’ generation regale us children about the music they grew up with. My baby-boomer parents navigated their way through vinyl, LPs, 8-track  tapes and mixtapes. “Here Comes the Sun” was released on “Abbey Road” while my dad was stationed at the[Read More…]

by February 2, 2011 0 comments The Guide

Finding an Ironic Needle in a Haystack of Films

The 1980s science-fiction sitcom “Small Wonder” had big plans for success. The story of a family of engineers disguising a robot as their daughter was supposed to touch millions of Americans and catapult the show into silver screen notoriety. While the show did not achieve its goal, it did result[Read More…]

by January 28, 2011 0 comments The Guide

Pre-Raphaelite School Puts Fresh Spin on Realism

The National Gallery of Art’s exhibit “The Pre-Raphaelite Lens: British Photography and Painting” welcomed me with a depiction of two lovers embracing each other passionately. At first glimpse, I had difficulty deciding whether it was a painting or a photograph. If it were oil on canvas, how could that young[Read More…]

by January 28, 2011 0 comments The Guide

Rom Com Holds On by a String

Romantic relationships are confusing, exciting, overwhelming, exhilarating and oftentimes frustrating. Most of all, however, they’re necessary. Let’s be real: We all know this on some level, either from personal experience or observations of our friends — and that’s not even including the veritable slew of romantic comedy films pervading Hollywood.[Read More…]

by January 28, 2011 0 comments The Guide

Enthralling Read Intimately Portrays Dynamic Characters

I’m not going to open this review of Jonathan Franzen’s latest novel, Freedom, with a few hokey lines, overwrought with cliches about what freedom represents to so many people, and then saying that it now means something entirely different to the literate world. Enough has been said of the work already[Read More…]

by January 28, 2011 0 comments The Guide

In Defense of the Music Industry’s So-Called Digital Doomsday

It was a big week for music, y’all. We celebrated the would-be 80th birthday of soul king Sam Cooke and the 123rd of O.G. folk singer Leadbelly. Coachella released a lineup for a summer music festival that is quite unbelievable, as it lists almost every decent band to walk the[Read More…]

by January 28, 2011 0 comments The Guide

Twilight’s Victorian Gothic Prequel

Before Edward, before Bill Compton and before Buffy, there was the Count. Not our monocled friend from Sesame Street, but Dracula himself. He struck fear into the straight-laced Victorians of days gone by. If you are looking for a classic read that contains any of the gothic elements that have become pop[Read More…]

by January 28, 2011 0 comments The Guide
Fine Art and the First Amendment

Fine Art and the First Amendment

This is not the first time a publicly funded arts organization has come into conflict with politicians who oppose certain subject matter. The ’90s saw the National Endowment for the Arts lose 40 percent of its funding in response to Robert Mapplethorpe’s homoerotic photography and Andres Serrano’s work titled “Piss[Read More…]

by January 28, 2011 0 comments The Guide