TO THE EDITOR:

Conor Hanlon’s piece (“Home Grown Fanatics,” THE HOYA, Feb. 8, 2005, A3) says Christiano-Fundamentalists (a word that only appears on far left blogs when Googled), have for “the most part avoided violence, but are still, like the Islamo-fascists, openly trying to turn religious law into state law.”

He fails to realize, however, that they are doing it through the ballot, not the bullet or suicide bomb. If he disagrees with Christians, he can protest, write asinine editorials or propose an original thought (rather unlikely).

But if he angers an Islamic terrorist, he had better hope that the imperialist U.S. military is there to stop the argument.

A terrorist can’t stand democracy because he knows his views are not popular with the electorate. Likewise, Hanlon’s views are not popular with the electorate, as witnessed on Nov. 2.

JUSTIN TAIT (SFS ’08)

FEB. 9, 2005

TO THE EDITOR:

Conor Hanlon’s piece (“Home Grown Fanatics,” THE HOYA, Feb. 8, 2005, A3) says Christiano-Fundamentalists (a word that only appears on far left blogs when Googled), have for “the most part avoided violence, but are still, like the Islamo-fascists, openly trying to turn religious law into state law.”

He fails to realize, however, that they are doing it through the ballot, not the bullet or suicide bomb. If he disagrees with Christians, he can protest, write asinine editorials or propose an original thought (rather unlikely).

But if he angers an Islamic terrorist, he had better hope that the imperialist U.S. military is there to stop the argument.

A terrorist can’t stand democracy because he knows his views are not popular with the electorate. Likewise, Hanlon’s views are not popular with the electorate, as witnessed on Nov. 2.

JUSTIN TAIT (SFS ’08)

FEB. 9, 2005

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