Everybody loves a good upset, and ever since David and Goliath signed on with the King James Network a long time ago, we have relied on college football to satisfy our need to see the little guy smack the bully in the teeth every so often. In baseball, a lousy team can take a good one on any given night, and both squads can leave the diamond feeling no better or worse about themselves than when the game began.

The same goes for pro basketball. I would say that upsets happen a lot in the NHL; that is, if I had ever cared about or seen an NHL game.

When football teams are dominant – like the Miami Hurricanes were in 2001 or the USC Trojans were in 2003 – nothing can stop them. But when a lowly David rises up and slings Goliath – like Appalachian State did to Michigan earlier this year – it is truly momentous.

Upsets are like Christmas or Halley’s Comet or good shows on FOX. If they happened everyday, they wouldn’t be special. That has been the case with this college football season. There have been so many upsets that it’s kind of getting, well, boring.

It started last January when Boise State – a team with a blue field – played Oklahoma – a school with seven national championships and four Heisman winners – in the Fiesta Bowl.

Then came the Appalachian State-Michigan fiasco, which made people in the Wolverine State wonder if the sun would rise again the following morning.

When peasant of the Pac-10 Stanford dethroned born-in-the-purple USC on October 6, anything seemed possible. Suddenly, Colorado thought they could beat Oklahoma, Kentucky believed they could stare down LSU, Oregon State decided Cal wasn’t all that scary, and everyone realized Notre Dame was just a few Jesuits shy of being Georgetown.

The result was the preseason national title contenders dropping like flies. There have been so many upsets this year that the upsetters have been upset. South Florida came out of nowhere to beat fifth-ranked West Virginia in late September.

Two weeks later, they were the nation’s second-best team. Then came three straight losses to lower-ranked opponents – including Connecticut (CONNECTICUT?!) – and the Bulls are now unranked and back to practicing their slingshot windup.

By the time Florida State ended Boston College’s dream season last Saturday, I didn’t even bother watching. I took it for granted. I have grown so weary of seeing underdogs win that I have started watching Mid-American Conference games on Tuesday nights, simply because I don’t know who is supposed to win. A good upset used to be like a strong sip of 25-year-old Glenfiddich. By the time the Seminoles knocked off the Golden Eagles last weekend, it tasted like a pull of watered-down Early Times.

When Michigan beats Ohio State on Nov. 17, will anyone notice? When Boise State sinks Hawaii’s BCS hopes the following week, will anyone care?

I lost hope a while ago. This whole season has gone haywire. Kansas and Hawaii are undefeated. This weekend, the best ABC’s Saturday Night Football can do is the ho-hum Kansas-Oklahoma State game. The USC-Cal game – preseason’s Pac 10 Judgment Day – doesn’t even matter anymore. Chris Folwer, Kirk Herbstreit, and Lee Corso will broadcast ESPN’s College Gameday from Williamstown, Mass. Where? What? That’s

right, the best “match-up” of the weekend is between two Division III schools whose mascots are the Ephmen and the Lord Jeffs. (I guess they figured the Delta State/Arkansas-Monticello clash wouldn’t sell).

My dad (Williams Class of ’72) is ecstatic. I am not. I am bored. I am sick of seeing Big East teams who shouldn’t even be mentioned until late January in the BCS standings. I am tired of hearing about a beach bum system quarterback with bleached hair being compared to Roger Staubach.

In other words, I’m upset.

Harlan Goode is senior in the College and features editor at THE HOYA. He can be reached at goodethehoya.com.

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