JEANINE SANTUCCI/THE HOYA
Georgetown will require Nike, Inc. to provide the Worker Rights Consortium, a labor rights group, access to supplier factories. The agreement comes after a 35-hour sit-in by the workers rights group Georgetown Solidarity Committee in December.

Georgetown will require Nike, Inc. to provide the Worker Rights Consortium, a labor rights group, access to supplier factories and ensure supply partners comply with new labor standards as part of a renewed contract announced this afternoon.

Georgetown allowed its contract with Nike to expire Dec. 31, 2016, following a 35-hour sit-in starting Dec. 8 at University President John J. DeGioia’s suite of offices by members of the workers’ rights group Georgetown Solidarity Committee.

As part of the agreement, the university has established a new protocol for remediation of issues identified by the Worker Rights Consortium and Nike’s suppliers will abide by the IMG College Licensing labor code standards.

The university agreed not to renew its contract with Nike unless the company agreed to allow full, independent access to the Workers Rights Consortium, an independent labor-monitoring group. The agreement also stipulated that Nike either sign the Code of Conduct for Georgetown University Licensees or establish its own code of conduct on par with the university code’s standards.

Students first raised concerns after a Nov. 17, 2015, Worker Rights Consortium memo to member universities stated Nike had denied it access to the Nike factory in Hansae, Vietnam, following the strike of thousands of employees at the factory in November 2015.

DeGioia said the agreement represents an important development for ensuring workers’ rights.  

“This new protocol reflects a process of sustained and principled engagement, allowing us to ensure that the safety, welfare, and rights of workers are protected and strengthened in meaningful ways,” DeGioia said in a university press release. “It represents the development of an important new framework for collaboration to protect workers’ rights around the world.”

This article will be updated as more information becomes available.

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2 Comments

  1. Zero comments from students. Nice.

  2. Pingback: VIEWPOINT: Learning to Dig Deeper

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