At a university like Georgetown, where the ideals of fairness and justice pervade the undergraduate experience, one would think an issue like equal study space for all students would never need to be debated. But the Rafik B. Hariri Building of the McDonough School of Business needs a lesson in equality, as it fails to open its doors to all students at all times.

After 10 p.m. on weekdays, the luxurious study spaces within Hariri are accessible only to MSB students. Although there are numerous ways to elude this restriction, such as having an MSB student swipe you in, the policy makes a symbolic statement contrary to the university’s basic principles of undergraduate equality.

It is true that MSB students pay a fee that goes in part to business-specific technology in the Hariri Building. But such a fee does not justify exclusivity. The other undergraduate colleges lack comparable academic venues on campus; Hariri is not just the best, but the only, study space of its kind.

Business students should, by all means, retain exclusive access to certain resources in the Hariri Building, such as the near-unlimited printing they enjoy. But there is no reasonable explanation for denying open access to general study space, including the campus-renowned breakout rooms.

Segregating resources based on undergraduate programs lacks precedent. Imagine if the computer lab in St. Mary’s Hall was reserved for students in the School of Nursing and Health Studies. What if business students were denied access to the Intercultural Center Galleria? Such standards would seem unreasonable, and reserving study space for the MSB is similarly petty.

The Georgetown University Student Association once decided to tackle the topic of this separated student study space, but the issue was placed on the back burner during the Student Activities Fee Endowment reform. It’s time to revisit the issue.

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