Post Tagged with: "history"

ELIZA PHILLIPS FOR THE HOYA
An Art exhibit celebrating the lives of the GU 272 went on display Tuesday morning. Mélisande Short-Colomb, one of the principal organizers, said she hopes this raises awareness in the Georgetown community about the university's history with slavery and prevents current dialogue from dying out.

Art Celebrating GU272 on Display in Red Square

Student-made artwork honoring the lives of the 272 slaves sold by Georgetown in 1838 were hung in Red Square on Tuesday morning. The art installation, which, weather permitting, will be taken down on Friday, was created as part of the GU272 campaign that began in 2015. Mélisande Short-Colomb (COL ’21),[Read More…]

by September 7, 2018 0 comments Campus News, News, News - Top
SMITHSONIAN/FOR THE HOYA
Weekday visitors to the National Museum of African American History and Culture no longer need advance passes, beginning in September.

Smithsonian African-American History Museum Waives Weekday Passes

The National Museum of African American History and Culture’s launch of its trial weekday, no-pass entry program attracted over 7,000 visitors on the first day of the monthlong program. Dubbed “Walk-Up Weekdays,” the museum’s program waives the requirement for timed-entry passes to be obtained in advance on weekdays in the[Read More…]

by September 7, 2018 0 comments City News, News, News - Top
GOLDSTEIN: Finding Identity in History

GOLDSTEIN: Finding Identity in History

When I walk past Lauinger Library these days, I think of Fr. Leonard Neale, S.J. When Neale was president of Georgetown College from 1798 to 1806, his bedroom in Old South — the first building to grace the Hilltop — doubled as the campus library. Every night Neale would unfold[Read More…]

by May 18, 2018 1 comment Opinion, Opinion - Top
KAPASI: Struggling with San Jacinto

KAPASI: Struggling with San Jacinto

A 567-foot-tall obelisk stands 20 minutes outside Houston. The structure commemorates the Battle of San Jacinto, which won Texas’ independence from Mexico on April 21, 1836. Retreating Texan forces, led by General Samuel Houston, surprised General Antonio López de Santa Anna’s larger Mexican force near the San Jacinto River. The[Read More…]

by April 24, 2018 1 comment Opinion, Opinion - Top
KAPASI: The Firebombing of Dresden

KAPASI: The Firebombing of Dresden

Neither an industrial center nor a wartime hub, a defenseless Dresden, Germany, was firebombed by Allied aircraft mere months before German surrender, between Feb. 13 and 15 in 1945. A firestorm caused by the thousands of tons of explosives engulfed the city, consuming the very oxygen in the air. Secondary[Read More…]

by February 14, 2018 3 comments Opinion, Opinion - Top
‘The Great Society’ Reimagines Former President Lyndon Johnson

‘The Great Society’ Reimagines Former President Lyndon Johnson

Directed by Kyle Donnelly and performed in Arena Stage’s Fichandler Stage, “The Great Society” brings to life the ambition and struggle of the 36th president of the United States. Robert Schenkkan’s “The Great Society” play begins with President Lyndon Johnson’s 1964 landslide presidential victory. Picking up where Schenkkan’s Tony Award-winning[Read More…]

by February 13, 2018 0 comments The Guide, Theatre
KAPASI: A Warning From Uganda

KAPASI: A Warning From Uganda

On Feb. 2, 1971, Idi Amin Dada seized power in the East African nation of Uganda. His military coup ushered in eight years of violence, erratic behavior and economic collapse to the newly independent state. The ethnic nationalist policies he implemented scattered refugees across the globe, including my father. Amin’s[Read More…]

by January 30, 2018 0 comments Opinion, Opinion - Top
FORD'S THEATRE

Theater Review: ‘Jefferson’s Garden’ at Ford’s Theatre

Ford’s Theatre’s historical significance as the place Abraham Lincoln was assassinated lends weight to the performance of “Jefferson’s Garden,” a show that explores the tensions between the ideals of the Founding Fathers and the difficult realities of freedom in America. British playwright Timberlake Wertenbaker’s scenes illustrate important historical markers, making[Read More…]

KAPASI: The Wounded Knee Massacre

KAPASI: The Wounded Knee Massacre

The Wounded Knee Massacre, the murder of Lakota refugees by the U.S. Cavalry in 1890, was inevitable. This atrocity was the culmination of the centuries-long effort by European immigrants to exterminate the indigenous peoples of the Plains, an indelible desire to expand fueled by Manifest Destiny. Despite the infamy of[Read More…]

by January 26, 2018 1 comment Opinion, Opinion - Top

Old Stone House to Close Today for Yearlong Renovations

The Old Stone House, the oldest structure still on its original foundation in Washington, D.C., closes today to begin about one year of renovations. The renovations will install a new fire suppression system, stabilize the building’s foundation, fix the exterior stonework and upgrade the plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems, according[Read More…]

by November 1, 2017 0 comments City News, News, News - Top