Post Tagged with: "civil rights"

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE

Mark Bradford Presents ‘Pickett’s Charge’ at the Hirshhorn

“It kind of worked out, right?” said Mark Bradford, smiling and gesturing to his almost-400-square-foot creation at the Nov. 7 press preview of his new exhibit, “Pickett’s Charge.” The contemporary artist’s newest work occupies the entire th ird floor of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden beside the National Mall.[Read More…]

COURTESY INES HILDE
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg praised growing equality for women in the legal field in an address at the Law Center.

Justice Ginsburg Praises Higher Representation of Women in Law

Opportunities for women in the legal field have improved drastically over the past 50 years, said Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Georgetown University Law Center on Wednesday afternoon. Ginsburg, speaking to first-year students at GULC, said the industry has seen a monumental shift toward gender equity in[Read More…]

by September 22, 2017 0 comments City News, News, News - Top

FLEMING-KLINK: Criminal Justice Reform, One Box at a Time

For those seeking to enact criminal justice reform and policies aimed at increasing the chances of employment for ex-offenders, referred to as returning citizens, there exist particular policies normally discussed as ‘banning-the-box’. Such policies require employers to remove the box on employment forms that applicants are asked to check if[Read More…]

by June 22, 2016 0 comments Commentary, Opinion, Opinion - Top

Civil Rights Authors Discuss Activism, History

In honor of Black History Month, civil rights authors Andrew Aydin (GRD ’12) and Edward Peeples explored their published works and articulated personal stories of activism within the civil rights movement in a discussion hosted by Georgetown University’s graduate liberal studies department, titled “Civil Rights in Black and White: Two[Read More…]

by February 19, 2016 0 comments Campus News, News, News - Top

Continue the Disability Conversation

To the Editor, As a proud Hoya alum, class of 1984, I was alarmed by the article “Make Campus Accessible for All” (The Hoya, A3, Dec 4, 2015). I am a nationally recognized advocate for persons with disabilities. As a blind student, I faced and overcame many barriers. In those[Read More…]

by January 26, 2016 0 comments Opinion, Opinion - Top
Hoya History

Hoya History

In its mission to cover Georgetown’s news of the day, The Hoya has in fact covered some of the 20th and 21st centuries’ most enduring news. Below is a collection of some of The Hoya’s most memorable moments, which have resonated beyond Georgetown.     Have a reaction to this article?[Read More…]

by January 16, 2015 0 comments The 95th Anniversary Issue
Michelle Xu

In Qatar, SFS Subject to Brutal Regime

Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service operates a satellite campus in an oppressive Middle Eastern dictatorship. Funded by oil money and corrupt sheikhs, Georgetown University effectively condones and promotes the human rights abuses of our host country. Why does no one talk about this? Georgetown is not alone; we’re one[Read More…]

by October 3, 2014 148 comments Commentary, Opinion, Opinion - Top

ACLU Holds Talk on DC Issues

The Future Leaders Council of the American Civil Liberties Union of the Nation’s Capital held an event Friday on civil rights issues, primarily those concerning Washington, D.C., in an effort to increase the group’s visibility to college and high school students. “We really just want to get the ACLU out[Read More…]

by February 26, 2013 0 comments City News, News

First Black Undergraduate Dies

Samuel Halsey Jr. (SFS ’53), who died last month at the age of 87, left behind three siblings, four children and more than a dozen grandchildren and great-grandchildren. But he also left an enduring legacy at Georgetown as the first black undergraduate to be admitted to the school. Valedictorian of his high[Read More…]

by March 28, 2012 0 comments News

Court Set to Review Civil Rights at Religious Schools

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a landmark case that could reshape the employment practices of religious institutions. Since the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964, religious institutions have been considered exempt from many anti-discrimination laws. However, a teacher who was fired from a Lutheran school[Read More…]

by October 4, 2011 0 comments Campus News, City News, News