The current political climate in the nation’s capital gives the Democrats a distinct advantage in the upcoming presidential election, ABC News’ Chief Washington Correspondent George Stephanopoulos told a capacity crowd in the Intercultural Center Auditorium on Tuesday.

“Structurally, this [political climate] is set up for the Democrats to win easily,” he said. “This is basically a Democratic year, and it would be really remarkable if that enthusiasm we saw through 2007 and 2008 wasn’t brought to a victory for the Democrats in November.”

Stephanopoulos currently hosts his own Sunday morning news show on ABC, “This Week with George Stephanopoulos.” Before coming to ABC, he served as senior advisor on policy and strategy for President Bill Clinton (SFS ’68), as well as White House communications director.

Stephanopoulos said this election marks a defining moment for American politics.

“I think we’re living through, right now, some of the most exciting political times of our lifetime,” he said. “We’re seeing an election where the stakes could not be higher, where people could not be more engaged than they are right now.”

He concentrated heavily on the two Democratic candidates and their political strengths during the address. Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), he said, has unmatched experience in policymaking from her time in the White House as first lady, but everyone, including her, must still take a huge leap in assuming the role of the nation’s commander-in-chief.

“There is no substitute for that kind of experience, but it doesn’t lend itself to use as leverage,” he said. “Experience is a real double-edged sword when the impulse of the country is to say, `We want a change.'”

Stephanopoulos also addressed the chances of Clinton passing Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) in the Democratic National Convention delegate count, which he characterized as slim.

“Mathematically it’s close to impossible, but stranger things have happened,” he said.

Despite this advantage, Stephanopoulus admitted that the general election is far from decided. He noted that Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) is the most formidable candidate the Republicans could have selected.

Entitled “Politics 2008: Personal Insights and Predictions,” the event was designated as the Mike Jurist (SFS ’07) Memorial Lecture, in memory of the late alumnus and former chair of the Lecture Fund. The event was sponsored by the Lecture Fund and THE HOYA.

Stephanopoulos also specifically addressed the many students in the audience, encouraging them to be patient in selecting a career and carving their niche in the world.

“I know a lot of you are struggling with what you’re going to do with your life. All I can say is don’t worry too much about where it’s all going to end up,” he said. “You want to find something that engages your heart and your mind.”

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The current political climate in the nation’s capital gives the Democrats a distinct advantage in the upcoming presidential election, ABC News’ Chief Washington Correspondent George Stephanopoulos told a capacity crowd in the Intercultural Center Auditorium on Tuesday.

“Structurally, this [political climate] is set up for the Democrats to win easily,” he said. “This is basically a Democratic year, and it would be really remarkable if that enthusiasm we saw through 2007 and 2008 wasn’t brought to a victory for the Democrats in November.”

Stephanopoulos currently hosts his own Sunday morning news show on ABC, “This Week with George Stephanopoulos.” Before coming to ABC, he served as senior advisor on policy and strategy for President Bill Clinton (SFS ’68), as well as White House communications director.

Stephanopoulos said this election marks a defining moment for American politics.

“I think we’re living through, right now, some of the most exciting political times of our lifetime,” he said. “We’re seeing an election where the stakes could not be higher, where people could not be more engaged than they are right now.”

He concentrated heavily on the two Democratic candidates and their political strengths during the address. Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), he said, has unmatched experience in policymaking from her time in the White House as first lady, but everyone, including her, must still take a huge leap in assuming the role of the nation’s commander-in-chief.

“There is no substitute for that kind of experience, but it doesn’t lend itself to use as leverage,” he said. “Experience is a real double-edged sword when the impulse of the country is to say, `We want a change.'”

Stephanopoulos also addressed the chances of Clinton passing Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) in the Democratic National Convention delegate count, which he characterized as slim.

“Mathematically it’s close to impossible, but stranger things have happened,” he said.

Despite this advantage, Stephanopoulus admitted that the general election is far from decided. He noted that Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) is the most formidable candidate the Republicans could have selected.

Entitled “Politics 2008: Personal Insights and Predictions,” the event was designated as the Mike Jurist (SFS ’07) Memorial Lecture, in memory of the late alumnus and former chair of the Lecture Fund. The event was sponsored by the Lecture Fund and THE HOYA.

Stephanopoulos also specifically addressed the many students in the audience, encouraging them to be patient in selecting a career and carving their niche in the world.

“I know a lot of you are struggling with what you’re going to do with your life. All I can say is don’t worry too much about where it’s all going to end up,” he said. “You want to find something that engages your heart and your mind.”

Have a reaction to this article? Write a letter to the editor.

Comments are closed.