Softball | No-Hitter in Finale Caps Pitching Career

FILE PHOTO: JULIA HENNRIKUS/THE HOYA Senior pitcher Megan Hyson threw a no-hitter in the final start of her collegiate career against Seton Hall. She struck out six batters, allowed only one walk, and drove in three runs as a hitter in her team’s 7-1 win.

FILE PHOTO: JULIA HENNRIKUS/THE HOYA
Senior pitcher Megan Hyson threw a no-hitter in the final start of her collegiate career against Seton Hall. She struck out six batters, allowed only one walk, and drove in three runs as a hitter in her team’s 7-1 win.

It was the kind of moment every kid dreams about. Even if it had been scripted, it could not have been much better. With three outs to go, Georgetown senior pitcher Megan Hyson retired the last three Seton Hall batters in order to complete a no-hitter and record her final win, a performance that brought meaning back to a largely forgettable season for Georgetown softball.

Hyson led the Blue and Gray (15-32, 5-14 Big East) to a 7-1 victory to close out the season, striking out six batters and recording only one walk en route to the second no-hitter of her career. But she did not even realize how good she had been until the game was over.

“I had no idea because I remember people being on base and I thought that one girl got a hit,” Hyson said. “I found out because one of the parents came up to me and congratulated me, and the coach on the other team said something. That’s when I figured out I had the no-hitter.”

The only blemish came in the fourth inning, when Seton Hall capitalized on a walk and an error to score an unearned run. But Georgetown came out swinging, scoring two runs in the first inning on the way to seven overall. Hyson helped herself out by providing production at the plate, driving in three runs.

“Not only did I think Megan had a great game in the circle, I think we as a team played one of our best games of the year,” Head Coach Pat Conlan said. “We played the Seton Hall weekend the way I believed we could play all year.”

For her efforts, Hyson was named Big East Pitcher of the Week, recording a 0.81 ERA over the weekend in 17 innings.

It was an emotional game for Hyson, playing the last game of her collegiate career in a season when Georgetown, selected in the preseason to finish third in the Big East, instead finished last and failed to make the tournament.

“The season wasn’t exactly the way I wanted it to turn out, because I felt like this year was going to be the year we were going to win the Big East tournament,” Hyson said.

But her teammates did not let her down.

“The team chemistry was awesome at the end, and everybody got along, and I think that’s why it made it so upsetting at the last game,” Hyson said. “But it was good that we got the win at the end, end our season on a good note.”

It was a brilliant close to a brilliant career. Hyson won 11 games this season and recorded a 3.19 ERA with 182 strikeouts. Over her four years, she struck out 596 batters. In her junior campaign, Hyson was named to the All-Big East Second Team after leading the Hoyas in multiple batting categories as well as on the mound, recording a 2.36 ERA. Hyson received Big East Pitcher of the Week honors twice last year.

“She is one of the best to wear our Hoya uniform,” Conlan said. “She could do it with her bat and on the mound, which you do not see much anymore. Most pitchers today just focus on their craft.”

Maybe it is because Hyson didn’t always see herself as a pitcher.

“I didn’t always want to be a pitcher, but one game [as a kid] they just needed someone to pitch, and I halfway pitched,” Hyson said. “Then I just all of a sudden started learning pitching, so I kind of just kept with it.”

Hyson did more than that; she became dominant. In college she regularly pitched late into games and kept her ERA low while giving Georgetown a chance to compete offensively.

According to Hyson, Georgetown did just as much for her as she did for it. She plans on pursuing a career in nursing and credits Conlan with encouraging her to pursue her passions on and off the field.
“I don’t think there would have been another school [where] I would have been that successful, especially doing both school and softball,” Hyson said. “It hasn’t hit me yet — I still think I’m coming back next year.”

There are many who wish she could return once more to the field and lead the charge because of the tremendous impact she had on the Georgetown program.

“She loves to play and you could see that every day of her career. Megan holds numerous records and holds the most honors of anyone who has played here,” Conlan said. “It was a privilege to coach her, and I am so thankful that Megan took a chance on us.”

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