TO THE EDITOR:

In response to Friday’s letter, which addressed the “infringement on [the] rights of expression” of protesters (“Living Wage Rally Ends in Denial of Entrance,” THE HOYA, Feb. 4, 2005, A2), I would like to offer some clarification for those students who are not familiar with Georgetown’s Speech and Expression Policy.

For future reference, it might behoove protesters to read this document before they write heated letters that bemoan Georgetown’s infringement upon Constitutional Rights.

The Georgetown Speech and Expression Policy was written to inform students that dialogue and dissent on campus is good (and even encouraged according to the document). But there are limitations to this freedom of speech policy.

If one wishes to protest in a certain area, one must first reserve the area through the university in order to protect the equally important rights of others who are within the area. Unless the Living Wage Coalition reserves all of Healy, the President’s office and the surrounding areas, an individual as part of a protest group cannot enter an area as a means of furthering the demonstration. These rules should be respected, studied, memorized and understood by any group wishing to protest or hold a demonstration.

This policy is fair and should be respected by the students of this campus. It is enforced because my right to pay over $80 for an economics class in Healy in order to learn about the infeasibility of raising the minimum wage (especially while an institution is financially unstable) is equally as important as a protester’s right to express that he or she wants to raise my annual tuition in order to further his or her own cause.

I personally appreciate dialogue, dissent and demonstrations on this campus. Protesters, however, must respect the policies of the university before demanding apologies from professionals who are wrongfully accused of infringing upon their rights.

KATHERINE BOYLE (COL ’08) FEB. 5, 2005 TO THE EDITOR:

In response to Friday’s letter, which addressed the “infringement on [the] rights of expression” of protesters (“Living Wage Rally Ends in Denial of Entrance,” THE HOYA, Feb. 4, 2005, A2), I would like to offer some clarification for those students who are not familiar with Georgetown’s Speech and Expression Policy.

For future reference, it might behoove protesters to read this document before they write heated letters that bemoan Georgetown’s infringement upon Constitutional Rights.

The Georgetown Speech and Expression Policy was written to inform students that dialogue and dissent on campus is good (and even encouraged according to the document). But there are limitations to this freedom of speech policy.

If one wishes to protest in a certain area, one must first reserve the area through the university in order to protect the equally important rights of others who are within the area. Unless the Living Wage Coalition reserves all of Healy, the President’s office and the surrounding areas, an individual as part of a protest group cannot enter an area as a means of furthering the demonstration. These rules should be respected, studied, memorized and understood by any group wishing to protest or hold a demonstration.

This policy is fair and should be respected by the students of this campus. It is enforced because my right to pay over $80 for an economics class in Healy in order to learn about the infeasibility of raising the minimum wage (especially while an institution is financially unstable) is equally as important as a protester’s right to express that he or she wants to raise my annual tuition in order to further his or her own cause.

I personally appreciate dialogue, dissent and demonstrations on this campus. Protesters, however, must respect the policies of the university before demanding apologies from professionals who are wrongfully accused of infringing upon their rights.

KATHERINE BOYLE (COL ’08) FEB. 5, 2005

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