To the Editor:

I read Eric Rodawig’s latest column (“A Red Light for Federal Financial Aid,” THE HOYA, Dec. 2, 2005, A3) with interest and was deeply saddened that a fellow Hoya could vehemently support legislation that would make attending this school impossible for so many of his classmates.

Rodawig writes that society should “rid itself of this powerful signaling effect that college labels have,” and since all the extra money gets you is fancily titled classes, those of us who can’t afford Georgetown should head for cheaper places.

What I find particularly interesting is that Rodawig argues these points, and yet chose Georgetown himself. So either he believes that it is indeed “worth an extra $50,000 to $150,000 to have an introductory theology class called “The Problem of God,” or he believes Georgetown presents unique opportunities.

I would have never made it through Georgetown without forms of federal financial aid like the much-endangered Perkins Loan. Most of my colleagues and superiors at the newspaper I work for now attended state schools or small colleges, and like Rodawig, I don’t believe the name on my diploma proves I am better educated than they are. But even though I shell out hundreds of dollars monthly to pay back federal student loans – federal aid mainly comes in the form of loans, not hand-outs, as Rodawig implies – I know my education was worth the price.

I went to Georgetown because I wanted a school filled with smart, passionate students, classes taught by top-notch professors, and a location in the capital city that offered great internships in my field. I did my research and looked into all those options Rodawig touts as right for people of my socio-economic background, and ultimately decided Georgetown was where I needed to be. Thankfully, back in 2000, there was aid available to help a girl whose family income was less than a year on the Hilltop costs.

Rodawig, congratulations, you’re a lucky boy if you don’t need aid. Thank your parents. But also try to understand that you are no more entitled to Georgetown than the financial aid students you accuse of feeling “owed” this education.

Robyn D. Russo (COL ’04)

Dec. 5, 2005

To the Editor:

In response to Eric Rodawig’s viewpoint, “A Red Light for Federal Financial Aid” (THE HOYA, Dec. 2, 2005, A3), I would like to point out that the federal government, to my knowledge, does not supply any one student with a $45,000-per-year education. The federal Pell Grant awards range from $400 to $4,050 per year. His argument that no one should feel entitled to have the government fund a top-25 university education is bizarre.

While I am thankful for my federal grant and loan, most of my tuition is paid by private scholarships, as it would have to be given the price tag. The amount of money our government loans or grants to college students is as welcome to one attending a small college or state university as it is to Georgetown students.

I would also like to suggest that Rodawig remember why financial aid, wherever it comes from, is essential in our pricey system of higher education. Diversity is not free on college campuses.

Elle Futch (SFS ’08)

Dec. 5, 2005

Have a reaction to this article? Write a letter to the editor.

Comments are closed.

To the Editor:

I read Eric Rodawig’s latest column (“A Red Light for Federal Financial Aid,” THE HOYA, Dec. 2, 2005, A3) with interest and was deeply saddened that a fellow Hoya could vehemently support legislation that would make attending this school impossible for so many of his classmates.

Rodawig writes that society should “rid itself of this powerful signaling effect that college labels have,” and since all the extra money gets you is fancily titled classes, those of us who can’t afford Georgetown should head for cheaper places.

What I find particularly interesting is that Rodawig argues these points, and yet chose Georgetown himself. So either he believes that it is indeed “worth an extra $50,000 to $150,000 to have an introductory theology class called “The Problem of God,” or he believes Georgetown presents unique opportunities.

I would have never made it through Georgetown without forms of federal financial aid like the much-endangered Perkins Loan. Most of my colleagues and superiors at the newspaper I work for now attended state schools or small colleges, and like Rodawig, I don’t believe the name on my diploma proves I am better educated than they are. But even though I shell out hundreds of dollars monthly to pay back federal student loans – federal aid mainly comes in the form of loans, not hand-outs, as Rodawig implies – I know my education was worth the price.

I went to Georgetown because I wanted a school filled with smart, passionate students, classes taught by top-notch professors, and a location in the capital city that offered great internships in my field. I did my research and looked into all those options Rodawig touts as right for people of my socio-economic background, and ultimately decided Georgetown was where I needed to be. Thankfully, back in 2000, there was aid available to help a girl whose family income was less than a year on the Hilltop costs.

Rodawig, congratulations, you’re a lucky boy if you don’t need aid. Thank your parents. But also try to understand that you are no more entitled to Georgetown than the financial aid students you accuse of feeling “owed” this education.

Robyn D. Russo (COL ’04)

Dec. 5, 2005

To the Editor:

In response to Eric Rodawig’s viewpoint, “A Red Light for Federal Financial Aid” (THE HOYA, Dec. 2, 2005, A3), I would like to point out that the federal government, to my knowledge, does not supply any one student with a $45,000-per-year education. The federal Pell Grant awards range from $400 to $4,050 per year. His argument that no one should feel entitled to have the government fund a top-25 university education is bizarre.

While I am thankful for my federal grant and loan, most of my tuition is paid by private scholarships, as it would have to be given the price tag. The amount of money our government loans or grants to college students is as welcome to one attending a small college or state university as it is to Georgetown students.

I would also like to suggest that Rodawig remember why financial aid, wherever it comes from, is essential in our pricey system of higher education. Diversity is not free on college campuses.

Elle Futch (SFS ’08)

Dec. 5, 2005

Have a reaction to this article? Write a letter to the editor.

Comments are closed.