Hotel Rooms Converted Into Student Housing

KATHLEEN GUAN/THE HOYA The second and third floors of the Georgetown University Hotel and Conference Center have been converted into student dormitories for 140 sophomores, juniors and seniors for the 2015-2016 academic year as part of the 2010 Campus Plan agreement to house 385 extra students on campus by the fall of 2015.

KATHLEEN GUAN/THE HOYA
The second and third floors of the Georgetown University Hotel and Conference Center have been converted into student dormitories for 140 sophomores, juniors and seniors for the 2015-2016 academic year as part of the 2010 Campus Plan agreement to house 385 extra students on campus by the fall of 2015.

One hundred and forty students moved into the second and third floors of the Georgetown University Hotel and Conference Center, which has been converted into temporary student housing for the 2015-2016 academic year, last week.

Seventy-nine percent of the hotel’s residents are sophomores, while 15 percent are juniors and six percent are seniors.

The conversion of the hotel space into dormitories comes as a result of the 2010 Campus Plan, which aims to house 385 extra students on campus by the fall of 2015. The hotel will provide housing for these extra students while construction for the Northeast Triangle Residence Hall continues.

Georgetown University Vice President for Planning and Facilities Management Robin Morey said the hotel will be used to house students until the Northeast Triangle Residence Hall opens in the summer of 2016.

The hotel dorm rooms are larger than doubles in traditional upperclassman dorms and also contain personal bathrooms. Since there aren’t laundry machines in the hotel, students must use the laundry room in Henle Village.

The hotel also offers housekeeping services for the rooms, which are offered once, twice or five times a week, for $35, $50 or $75, respectively. Students will be able to use credit cards and GOCard debit or flex dollars to order from the full room service menu.

Each floor has its own community and study room to ensure that students do not disturb hotel guests staying on the fourth and fifth floors, which cannot be accessed by students. Additionally, students enter the dorm from the Leavey Esplanade, while guests continue to use the north side entrance.

Students use their GOCards to access the elevators and their rooms. In addition, the hotel front desk provides students with free temporary GOCards, which are valid for 24 hours, in case they are locked out of their rooms.

Min Joo Lee (SFS ’18), a resident assistant at the hotel, said that she often needs to remind students that there are hotel guests staying on other floors.

“Something that has been important so far is that I always have to be mindful and remind residents of the fact that we share our space with hotel guests, and therefore need to be extra considerate with our noise level, move-in route and so on,” Lee said. “Other than that, I think it’s similar to other RA positions in upperclassmen residence halls.”

Each floor of the hotel also contains its own trash room, the contents of which the hotel staff disposes daily.

The hotel also offers a variety of its services to students living on its residential floors, including dry cleaning service with a 20 percent off student discount.

Despite the amenities provided by the hotel, residents noted that there are some drawbacks to living in these rooms, such as the distance to laundry machines and lack of kitchen access.

“I love living in the hotel. The staff is really accommodating. You can order room service and the rooms are really large,” resident Gina Kim (SFS ’18) said. “But I am still dreading trekking to Henle to do my laundry.”

Resident Lydia Bubniak (SFS ’18) agreed that the hotel needs to make improvements to its amenities.

“They did a good job overall. It’s quiet and private but still has more of a community feel than I expected,” Bubniak said. “There are a few things that could be improved logistically though, like access to a small kitchen and laundry room, both of which we have to go to Henle for, and much more lighting in the room for studying.”

Lee said that living in the hotel is a unique experience for residents.

“I think it’s pretty awesome that we’ll be the first and last Hoyas to call the GU Hotel our home,” Lee said.

 

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