Three days after being listed at $1.725 million, the Georgetown home where former president John F. Kennedy met Jacqueline Bouvier is under contract. Located at 3419 Q St. NW, the home is within walking distance from Georgetown’s busiest shopping centers.

The home was originally owned by a Mrs. Renshaw, who owned both 3419 and 3417 Q St. NW, which she later consolidated into one home between 1955 and 1956. The current owner, who has elected to remain anonymous, purchased the home in 1987. She became the sole owner in 1991.

ANNE STONECIPHER/THE HOYA The Georgetown home where JFK met Jackie Bouvier sold after three days on the market.

Michael Brennan Jr. of Sotheby’s International Realty is in charge of the historic home’s listing. The house is roughly 2,000 square feet and features three bedrooms, two bathrooms, an outdoor patio and a garage. Brennan’s listing on his website offers viewers the option to take a virtual tour of the property.

Brennan anticipated a quick sale before the house even went on the market.

“I do not anticipate it being actively on the market for long,” Brennan told The Washington Post on Feb. 6. “It’ll be snapped up quickly.”

He was right. After just three days on the market, according to Brennan, the house is officially under contract. No further details of the buyer were provided.

Bouvier met Kennedy for the first time at a dinner party at the Georgetown house in 1951. Journalist Charles Bartlett and his wife Martha were the renters of the home at the time and invited the two to dinner in the hopes that they would get along. Kennedy’s father, Joseph Kennedy, also encouraged the matchmaking, according to The Washington Post.

The two met during an intimate dinner of about eight people and the match was a resounding success. Two years later, they were married.

Kennedy was interested in Bouvier from the moment he met her, as the story goes.

“I’ve never met anyone like her,” Kennedy reportedly told a friend after the party, according to Edward Klein’s book “All Too Human: The Love Story of Jack and Jackie Kennedy.”

In 1956, five years after Kennedy and Bouvier were first introduced in the house, the home underwent a huge renovation that nearly doubled its size, according to an article in Mansion Global. The property’s size increased after merging with the townhouse next to it, according to The Washington Post. Although it was renovated, the home retains the original hardwood floors and a wood burning fireplace in the living room.

The home is officially no longer on the market, it but remains an important part of Georgetown’s history, and the country’s.

“It’s obviously a pretty special house. I think the house is a great example of Georgetown’s history,” Brennan said in an interview with The Hoya.

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