NIKITA BULEY/THE HOYA Papyrus, at 1300 Wisconsin Ave., was one of several Georgetown businesses to board up doors and windows in anticipation of Hurricane Sandy's wrath.
NIKITA BULEY/THE HOYA
Papyrus, at 1300 Wisconsin Ave., was one of several Georgetown businesses to board up doors and windows in anticipation of Hurricane Sandy’s wrath.

Several services in the District of Columbia remained suspended Monday evening, with disruptions expected to continue on Tuesday and later in the week as Hurricane Sandy worsens.

An alert from the D.C. government sent around 9 p.m. warned that the storm is expected to enter its strongest phase this evening, with winds gusting up to 60 miles per hour and rainfall continuing steadily.

The alert advised residents to avoid driving and urged them to keep roads free for emergency vehicles.

According to The Washington Post, the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority has announced that Metro and bus services, including the DC Circulator, will remain suspended Tuesday morning while WMATA determines damage done to the system.

The Federal Government also announced that it will remain closed on Tuesday. All federal government workers, except for emergency workers, those required to telework and those on business outside the District, will be excused from work tomorrow, according to The Washington Post.

The D.C. government is also expected to be closed on Tuesday.

An article in the Georgetown Patch cited a National Weather Service post that high flooding from the Potomac River can be expected by Thursday, as water levels are expected to exceed 15 feet. Water levels stood at 3.7 feet at 5 p.m. Monday, according to Georgetown Patch.

“Residents and businesses along the Potomac River … including [in] Washington, D.C., should prepare for a flood not seen since the floods of 1996,” a press release from the service said, referencing flooding caused by Hurricane Fran in August, 1996.

The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority reported Oct. 26 that it expects its drinking water treatment facilities to remain open despite the hurricane.

Pepco, which supplies electricity to the District of Columbia, reported that close to 3,000 customers are without power as of 9 p.m. Monday. According to an Oct. 29 press release, Pepco has arranged for an additional 1,500 staff from as far away as Texas and Mississippi to assist in restoration efforts. Citing a high volume of outages, the company has suspended its estimated time of restoration feature until further notice.

Several local Georgetown business were also boarded up and closed on Monday in anticipation of hurricane damages.

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