The summer of 1998 was pretty fun the first time around, at least the way I remember it. I was getting ready to enter senior year of high school, starting to think about what I might want to do after graduation and looking forward to my friends and me being 17 so we could finally drive.

Now, after the summer of 2001, am I the only one having a serious case of deja vu?

Think about it: We juniors, and I’m told the seniors, are starting to think, at least for our parents’ sake, about where our post-graduation days might take us, and a lot of us are looking forward to turning 21 so we can drink . legally.

But that happens every year and to every single class; it’s normal to feel like you’ve been through this ridiculous routine before. The weird thing is how much the events of the past summer have eerily mirrored those of three years ago.

In 1998, President Bill Clinton (SFS ’68), a young, popular, gray-haired, truth-evading Democrat was embroiled in a major controversy stemming from his relationship with a much younger intern.

In 2001, Representative Gary Condit (D-Calif.), a young, popular, gray-haired, truth-evading Democrat, is embroiled in a major media controversy – and potentially criminal charges – stemming from his relationship with a much younger intern.

Great, Sullivan, you’re thinking, you’ve gone and made a big deal about one odd coincidence again.

But wait, there’s more.

In 1998, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa were chasing the all-time single season home run record, with Sosa coming on late to challenge the early-season dominance of McGwire. Sosa eventually finished second.

In 2001, Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa are chasing the all-time single season home run record, with Sosa having come on late to challenge the early-season dominance of Bonds. Sosa will likely finish second.

Still don’t think its weird?

In 1998, the New York Yankees far outpaced the rest of Major League Baseball and made a serious run at the all-time single season victory record. Their strength lay in great pitching, defense and all-around fundamental soundness. They had no major offensive superstars and used a National League style of play to dominate baseball.

In 2001, the Seattle Mariners are obliterating the rest of Major League Baseball and making a serious run at the all-time single season victory record. Their strength lies in great pitching, defense and all-around fundamental soundness. They have no major offensive superstars and are using a National League style of play to dominate baseball.

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Comments are closed.

The summer of 1998 was pretty fun the first time around, at least the way I remember it. I was getting ready to enter senior year of high school, starting to think about what I might want to do after graduation and looking forward to my friends and me being 17 so we could finally drive.

Now, after the summer of 2001, am I the only one having a serious case of deja vu?

Think about it: We juniors, and I’m told the seniors, are starting to think, at least for our parents’ sake, about where our post-graduation days might take us, and a lot of us are looking forward to turning 21 so we can drink . legally.

But that happens every year and to every single class; it’s normal to feel like you’ve been through this ridiculous routine before. The weird thing is how much the events of the past summer have eerily mirrored those of three years ago.

In 1998, President Bill Clinton (SFS ’68), a young, popular, gray-haired, truth-evading Democrat was embroiled in a major controversy stemming from his relationship with a much younger intern.

In 2001, Representative Gary Condit (D-Calif.), a young, popular, gray-haired, truth-evading Democrat, is embroiled in a major media controversy – and potentially criminal charges – stemming from his relationship with a much younger intern.

Great, Sullivan, you’re thinking, you’ve gone and made a big deal about one odd coincidence again.

But wait, there’s more.

In 1998, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa were chasing the all-time single season home run record, with Sosa coming on late to challenge the early-season dominance of McGwire. Sosa eventually finished second.

In 2001, Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa are chasing the all-time single season home run record, with Sosa having come on late to challenge the early-season dominance of Bonds. Sosa will likely finish second.

Still don’t think its weird?

In 1998, the New York Yankees far outpaced the rest of Major League Baseball and made a serious run at the all-time single season victory record. Their strength lay in great pitching, defense and all-around fundamental soundness. They had no major offensive superstars and used a National League style of play to dominate baseball.

In 2001, the Seattle Mariners are obliterating the rest of Major League Baseball and making a serious run at the all-time single season victory record. Their strength lies in great pitching, defense and all-around fundamental soundness. They have no major offensive superstars and are using a National League style of play to dominate baseball.

Have a reaction to this article? Write a letter to the editor.

Comments are closed.